“I must stick to the post” — Stories about Hong Kong’s …

“I must stick to the post” — Stories about Hong Kong’s …



a person holding a sign


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Female Inspector Chiang Wan-shun of Hong Kong police accepts media interview in Hong Kong, south China on Dec. 16, 2019. (Xinhua) 

Constable Jason said he was fearless with the support from his family and friends and a sense of mission in his heart. “I only want to stop the violence and bring peace back to Hong Kong, and this is the main reason that keeps me strong.”

Facing attacks by rioters, female Inspector Chiang always told her colleagues to stay restrained while keeping high morale. “We are doing the right thing,” she said.

HONG KONG, Dec. 19 (Xinhua) — As the social unrest has gripped Hong Kong for more than six months, the global financial hub has witnessed unprecedented destruction and unimaginable atrocity by rioters. Amid all the dangers and difficulties, the Hong Kong police have always been protecting residents and safeguarding the rule of law.

In Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station, probably the most frequently besieged police station by rioters in recent months, Xinhua reporters spoke face-to-face with several front-line officers, who shared the untold stories behind the recent turmoil.






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Inspector Chan of Hong Kong police accepts media interview in Hong Kong, south China on Dec. 16, 2019. (Xinhua)

“I MUST STICK TO THE POST”

Chan, a rookie police officer, vividly remembered his first day on duty on the front line in June, only two months after finishing his training.

Facing a large group of rioters, the inspector admitted that he felt uneasy. “But at the same time, I told myself that as a police officer I can’t be afraid.”

“As long as I’m wearing the uniform, I must stick to the post and protect the lives and property of Hong Kong residents,” Chan said.

Since then, even burning petrol bombs could not make him flinch for a single second.

Chan usually stayed on duty for 15 to 17 hours a day and once, he even worked overtime for 36 hours non-stop. Home became only a place for sleeping and an interval between operations.

“Operations were always the top priority,” said Chan, who has now gotten used to sleeping on the ground after operations and eating only instant noodles or energy bars to save time.

Amid the recent dangerous situation, Chan’s family always reminded him to be careful every time he went to work, giving him important support.

Chan said the concern from his family and the danger facing him would not shake his determination — to let Hong Kong remain one of the safest places in the world.

Chan said he has two wishes: No one will get hurt anymore; and the unrest will end as soon as possible and all rioters will be brought to justice.



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Constable Jason of Hong Kong police accepts media interview in Hong Kong, south China on Dec. 18, 2019. (Xinhua)

“IF IT WASN’T ME, IT WOULD BE MY COLLEAGUES”

Constable Jason was hit by a petrol bomb and sustained serious burns on his left arm when guarding the main gate of the police station besieged by a large group of rioters about two months ago. Even with the injury, he managed to finish his duty before going to the hospital.

But he did not regret it and said he would have done the same if there was a second chance. “If it wasn’t me (who got injured), it would be my colleagues,” Jason said.

After being injured, the young police officer only took three days off before returning to the front-line.

Jason said he was fearless with the support from his family and friends and a sense of mission in his heart. “I only want to stop the violence and bring peace back to Hong Kong, and this is the main reason that keeps me strong.”

For months, rioters have been spreading rumors and smears about Hong Kong police in a bid to support their groundless accusation of so-called “police brutality”.

“They were trying to bring down the police force. At this moment, we must continue to fight to keep the residents from living in fear,” Jason said.

Jason hopes to spend more time with his family after the violence subsides, and his colleagues can also take a rest and relax a little bit.



a person standing in front of a sign


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Female Inspector Chiang Wan-shun of Hong Kong police accepts media interview in Hong Kong, south China on Dec. 16, 2019. (Xinhua)

“I KNOW WHAT I DID IS RIGHT”

Unlike riot police holding guns and shields, female officer Chiang Wan-shun played a softer role on the front-line.

“Just now, rioters poured some liquid. I don’t know if it is corrosive or not. Please stop looking around and leave as soon as possible,” during an operation a few weeks ago, the inspector in her 20s said to residents via a loud-speaker near the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU).

Not far away, rioters had turned the PolyU into a fortress and started to attack the police with lethal weapons.

“Our aim is to keep residents safe from violent acts of rioters,” Chiang told Xinhua.

Facing attacks by rioters, Chiang always told her colleagues to stay restrained while keeping high morale. “We are doing the right thing,” she said.

For the young female officer, petrol bombs in the streets posed grave danger, but the even bigger threat came from the cyberspace.

One day in August, Chiang found out that her personal information was made public online, including her photo, social platform account, date of birth and even home address. Days later, so was her father’s.

Since then, she started to receive harassing phone calls. “During that time, I was very worried about the safety of my family and was also afraid of being attacked by rioters after work, which fortunately did not happen,” she said.

Chiang said now she is not worried anymore because she realized that she did nothing wrong. “I take this job because I really want to help people. I know what I did is right.”

She was totally aware that taking interviews may draw attention from rioters and more doxxing may follow. “It’s inevitable. But If more people can hear me and then try to understand what the police are trying to do, I believe they will have a rethink, regardless of their political views.”

Published at Wed, 18 Dec 2019 20:33:36 +0000

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