October 4, 2019
Police Brutality News

Teenager shot by ‘trigger happy’ Hong Kong police charged …

Teenager shot by ‘trigger happy’ Hong Kong police charged …

Rioting in Hong Kong after police shot pro-democracy protester Tsang Chi-kin

The clash has fuelled anger over police brutality in Hong Kong (Picture: Reuters/Getty Images)

As anger mounts over police brutality in Hong Kong, the first protester to be shot by officers after months of pro-democracy protests is now facing charges.

Tsang Chi-kin, 18, is in hospital in a critical condition after being shot in the left shoulder during a clash with riot officers in the Tsuen Wan district on Tuesday.

Many students felt firing so close to his heart was an attempt to kill him, fuelling protesters’ calls for more police accountability.

On the same day people in the mainland celebrated the 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China, an officer shot Tsang as he struck him with a metal rod.

Videos on social media showed a dozen black-clad protesters throwing objects at police and closing in on a lone officer, who opened fire as the masked teenager approached.

Pro-democracy protesters throw Molotov cocktails at a police station In Tuen Wan district on October 2, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.

Black-clad youths threw petrol bombs at police buildings last night (Picture: Getty Images)

Protesters raise their hand to advocate for the anti-extradition movement's five core demands at Sha Tsui Road Playground.

Protesters raiser their hand to advocate for the anti-extradition movement’s five core demands at Sha Tsui Road Playground (Picture: SIPA USA/PA Images)

An anti-government protester holds a Molotov cocktail outside a police station in Tsuen wan in Hong Kong, China October 2, 2019.

Violent clashes come afters months of protests over the Beijing regime exerting its power over Hong Kong (Picture: Reuters)

Protesters raise their hand to advocate for the anti-extradition movement's five core demands at Sha Tsui Road Playground.

Demonstrators are demanding more democratic freedoms and police accountability (Picture: SIPA USA/PA)

The protester toppled backward on to the street, bleeding from below his left shoulder.

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Another protester was tackled by an officer while trying to drag the wounded teenager from the chaos as a petrol bomb exploded.

The government said Tsang’s condition was stable after surgery and said the case against him will be heard by a court this afternoon.

He will be among seven people charged with rioting and faces two additional counts of attacking police.

Rioting carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison.

A pro-democracy protester throws a box of molotov cocktail on to a fire at the entrance gate of the Tsuen Wan police station on October 02, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.

A rioter throws a box of molotov cocktails at the entrance of Tsuen Wan police station (Picture: Getty Images) People hold signs reading "Don't shoot our kids" as they gather on October 2, 2019 to support the 18-year-old student who was shot in the chest by a policeman the day before during clashes between protesters and police in the Tsuen Wan area of Hong Kong. - Flash-mob rallies broke out in Hong Kong on October 2 as anger mounted over police shooting a teenage protester who attacked officers in a dramatic escalation of the violent unrest that has engulfed the territory for months. (Photo by NICOLAS ASFOURI / AFP) (Photo by NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP via Getty Images) People taking part in peaceful protests held banners reading ‘Don’t shoot our kids’ (Picture: AFP/Getty Images)

The cartoon character Pepe the Frog is seen at a protest in Sha Tsui Road Playground, wearing a bloodied eye patch symbolizing a first aider whose eye was impacted by a riot control round.

A demonstrator at the Sha Tsui Road playground holds a cuddly Pepe the Frog wearing a bloodied eye patch, symbolising a first aider hit by a riot control round (Picture: SIPA USA/PA)

Pro democracy protesters throw molotov cocktails on the gates of the New Territories South Regional Headquarters, Tsuen Wan district, in Hong Kong on October 2, 2019.

Other protests turned more violent, as pro-democracy activists lit fires and smashed ATM machines (Picture: AFP/Getty Images)

Thousands of people rallied on Wednesday demanding police to take responsibility for the ‘unjustified’ shooting.

Pro-democracy legislator Claudia Mo said: ‘The Hong Kong police have gone trigger-happy and nuts.’

After viewing a video of the shooting, she said: ‘The sensible police response should have been to use a police baton or pepper spray, etc, to fight back.

‘It wasn’t exactly an extreme situation and the use of a live bullet simply cannot be justified.’

More than 2,000 people chanted ‘No rioters, only tyranny’ as they filled an open air stadium near Tsang’s school in Tsuen Wan district on Wednesday night.

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Many held posters reading ‘Don’t shoot our kids’ and held their arms in the location in which the protester took a bullet.

Schoolmates said Tsang loves basketball and is passionate about the pro-democracy movement.

Protesters in Guy Fawkes masks wave the Union Jack in the former British colony of Hong Kong at Sha Tsui Road Playground.

Protesters in Guy Fawkes masks wave the Union Jack in the former British colony (Picture: SIPA USA?PA)

A pro-democracy protester prepares to throw a molotov cocktail at a police station in Tuen Wan district on October 2, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.

This year’s protests kicked off over a proposed bill which could see Hong Kong suspects being extradited to the mainland for trial (Picture: Getty Images)

Protesters erect barricades using construction site materials on Tai Ho Road.

Demonstrators worry the People’s Republic is chipping away at Hong Kong’s freedoms (Picture: SIPA USA/PA)

Graffiti is seen on a wall outside a police station in Tsuen wan in Hong Kong, China October 2, 2019.

People have slammed the police for being heavy handed and ‘trigger happy’ (Picture: Reuters)

One student in a Guy Fawkes mask, who did not want to be named due to fear of reprisals, said: ‘During the protests, we would feel safe if he is around because he was always the first to charge forward and would protect us when we were in danger.

‘I vividly remember him saying that he would rather die than be arrested. What an awful twist of fate that it was he of all people who was shot by the police.’

Several other peaceful rallies were held elsewhere, with protesters vowing not to give up their fight for more rights including direct elections for the city’s leaders.

But officers fired tear gas at pockets of black-clad youths who threw petrol bombs at police buildings, vandalised subway stations, smashed bank of China ATMs and blocked traffic with dug up bricks and metal railings.

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Today 1,000 students have marched on the Chinese University in solidarity with Tsang and to keep up their fight for their democratic freedoms.

Authorities have defended the shooting as ‘reasonable and lawful’ and say the officer had feared for his life and that of his colleagues.

Pro democracy protesters leave the scene where they throwed molotov cocktails on the gates of the New Territories South Regional Headquarters, in the Tsuen Wan district, in Hong Kong on October 2, 2019

Pro democracy protesters leave the scene after molotov cocktails were thrown at the gates of the New Territories South Regional Headquarters (Picture: AFP/Getty Images)

A pro-democracy protester throws a molotov cocktail on the gates of the New Territories South Regional Headquarters, in the Tsuen Wan district, in Hong Kong on October 2, 2019.

Violent unrest has engulfed the semi-autonomous Chinese territory for several months (Picture: AFP/Getty Images)

A pro-democracy protester throws a box of molotov cocktails at a police station in Tuen Wan district on October 2, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.

Protesters say the police did not use reasonable force against Tsang Chi-kin, 18 (Picture: Getty Images)

A protester throws a petrol bomb at Tsuen Wan police station in Hong Kong, Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019.

The teenage suspect is among seven people charged with rioting and faces two additional counts of attacking police (Picture: AP)

Hong Kong Deputy Police Commissioner Tang Ping-Keung denied claims officers were given permission to shoot to kill.

He said the shot to the chest was an attempt to immobilise Tsang quickly and effectively.

Tang said the officer’s action was in line with international procedures, but that police would mount an in-depth investigation.

Hong Kong’s government said widespread rioting on Tuesday was ‘planned and organised’ and called on parents and teachers to help restrain young offenders.

It comes amid widespread violence in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory over fears the Beijing communist regime is chipping away at Hong Kong’s democratic freedoms.

They were triggered in June by a proposed extradition bill which could see suspects from the region tried in the People’s Republic of China, despite having a separate judiciary.

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It is unclear if Tsang will appear in court, as the charges can be made in his absence.

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Published at Thu, 03 Oct 2019 03:08:00 +0000

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Source: Teenager shot by ‘trigger happy’ Hong Kong police charged …

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